New answers tagged

-3

If the police came and took my phone away, and nothing else, technically (not legally) I would be in the same situation as if a robber took my phone away. With my setup, if a robber took my phone, I would go to the nearest computer and lock and erase my phone remotely, go to my phone provider to get a new SIM card, go to the phone store and buy a new phone, ...


5

Assuming that the police have a warrant to seize your cell phone, the scope of what can be seized is specified in the warrant. It is not automatic that seizing a phone entails seizure of some or all online accounts (e.g. automatic backups, collections of passwords in a Google account) and it does not automatically "freeze" or block a person's ...


1

The FBI doesn't sit around waiting for other agencies to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the FBI has jurisdiction. The FBI is allowed to be proactive: they have every right to investigate whether a case falls in their jurisdiction. Of course, that involves the same sleuthing needed to solve the case itself. As an example, the FBI did respond to the ...


6

Because kidnapping is a violation of state law, the Colorado Bureau of Investigation would have jurisdiction to investigate. Assuming the crime occurred in the sheriff's home county, the undersheriff would take over and could also investigate. And if the sheriff is missing for more than 24 hours, federal law assumes that he was kidnapped using the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included