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I would agree that a person may be sued for civil damages by someone harmed by the wrongful conduct for which they were pardoned. A pardon also does not relieve a party of civil contempt sanctions (i.e. contempt sanctions that can be terminated upon compliance by the person held in contempt of court with a court order) even though it may relieve a party of ...


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Yes, they can be sued civilly Or, for that matter, be prosecuted by another jurisdiction- pardons only work within the jurisdiction that issued them. In a common law jurisdiction, the pardon cannot be used as evidence Nor, for that matter, can a criminal conviction. This is partly because the elements that need to be proved for the civil wrong won’t ...


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Questionable and Unsettled First, I am not a lawyer, nor a constitutional scholar. but Ford's pardon of Nixon was never tested in court so there is no precedent here. Some would like to claim that the pardon was valid, but until there is a test, no one can really say. The reason that it was never tested was that people were relieved to see Nixon go at the ...


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Yes. The precedent is President Gerald Ford's pardon of his predecessor Richard Nixon in proclamation 4311 before any possible prosecution had started. The pardon was granted specifically to prevent the disturbance of "the tranquility to which the nation has been restored" by "the prospects of bringing to trial a former President of the United ...


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As a practical matter, a pardon needs to be disclosed to be effective. Authenticating a pardon would be much more difficult if it was was not disclosed, making it much harder to utilize. No U.S. law prevents a pardon that is issued from being a public record subject to disclosure, e.g., via the Freedom of Information Act, so there is a compulsory process by ...


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