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60

We could start with what the statutes say (HSC 102425) (a) The certificate of live birth for a live birth occurring on or after January 1, 2016, shall contain those items necessary to establish the fact of the birth and shall contain only the following information; (1) Full name and sex of the child. It says nothing about the form of that name. ...


10

Although your "title" may not of itself have legal force, that doesn't necessarily mean you can do as you please in every situation without fear of liability. For example, if you falsely claim to be a medical doctor or lawyer, you could find yourself liable for civil damages to defrauded clients; you may also violate criminal laws. (An anonymous ...


6

Why do you think the man is unidentifiable? He's the guy standing in the dock. While a person's name is a handy shorthand for them; it's not their identity. Many people have several names and nicknames - this guy has none: he's still this guy.


5

Name-changing can facilitate escaping liability, so that e.g. if you are liable to someone for $20,000 and you change your name, you may be able to evade that liability. If a name change is made public, then others who have a legal claim against you are officially put on notice that Elmore James is now known as Lee Smith, and paperwork naming the respondent ...


5

The law allows you to name your child whatever you want with some exceptions: names containing ideograms, pictograms, diacritical marks, obscenities or too long names are prohibited. That said, there is no law to forbid naming your child Bob Jr. (or even Bob Sr. or Bob The Great). With numbers, things are a little bit tricky and vary from state to state, ...


5

There is ultimately no meaningful regulation of name choice in the United States, but failing to follow convention can be a pain. Many countries have far more rigorous regulation of names and often require that a name be on a pre-approved list or at least that it receive advanced governmental approve. For example, I changed my surname when I married from "...


4

This generally requires a court order (everything depends on jurisdiction: this is a state matter, not a federal matter). As a minor, the courts could allow your parents to change from Dweezil to William without involving you, until you are old enough that the judge thinks you might be able to have reasonable input into the matter. Once you're over 18, your ...


4

I am answering primarily with regard to the U.S. Lanham Act (15 U.S.C. § 1501 et seq.) and state trademark laws in the U.S., but except as noted, these concepts are widely honored internationally in trademark law. As a general rule, generic names cannot be trademarked. Thus, you can't trademark "liquor store" for a liquor store, or "Calendar" for a calendar,...


4

I can't answer this for all of Europe, but in the UK you can pick your company name as long as it cannot be confused with the name of another UK company (and some other rules, like you cannot name it Her Royal Majesty's Game Studio). Both companies may want to register trademarks, and if they register a trademark in the USA that you registered in the EU, ...


4

You cannot have an infinitely long name because a name has to be something that can be written down or spoken to be used. An infinitely long name can't be written down or spoken.


4

So as per recent Supreme Court decision in Matal v. Tam, the phohibitation of the registration of trademarks that may "disparage" persons, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols was ruled Unconstititutional. At issue, Tam, the bassist and founder of an all Asian-American band that was named after a slur for Asians (the linked article contains the Band ...


3

I thought I would add my experience as an answer now that I've spoken to the right people and been back to collect the wedding certificate. Within the EU there is a certificate that adopts the "international model" which means it comes in around 10 different languages. We asked the registry office in Portugal if our certificate could come in that form. As ...


3

To quote Wikipedia: In theory anyone who is at least 16 and resident in the United Kingdom can call themselves whatever they wish. In practice, however, some form of documentary evidence is required when changing your name on bank accounts, passport, etc: Documentary evidence of a change of name can be in a number of forms, such as a marriage ...


3

The law on the web page is not current: as of the beginning of the year, RCW 23.86.030(1) reads (you'll find this under Sec. 9103) "The name of any association subject to this chapter must comply with part I, Article 3 of this act" and is otherwise unchanged. In Article 3, sec. 1301 governs names, giving the sec'y some discretion to deem a name to not be ...


3

Was the case Sealed? Or is it considered to be Private? Those are two different cases. I was not able to find any laws regarding sealing, or expunging records of Name Changes, but was able to find the Utah Law for Criminal Records. I can only assume they draw from one another. All that being said, assuming your whatever case is sealed, then Some ...


3

Laws about names vary from state to state. One of the more common ways to give a person a name is to report a birth to the state in obedience to the laws requiring that births be reported; the state, if satisfied as to the accuracy of the report, issues a birth certificate. The name appearing on the birth certificate is often regarded as the person's full ...


3

No law in the US requires that parent and child have the same last name. It is usual that a child's name match that of at least one parent, but not required. A parent can change his or her name, without changing the names of any existing children. Also, when a child is adopted, the child's name need not be changed to match the name of the parents, or either ...


3

Yes, this could become an issue Trademark infringement occurs when you use another’s trademark in a way that could cause confusion to the consumer. Is it possible that people will be confused that your company produced a game of the same name? Yes. Is that trademark infringement? Possibly. Would a company like Bethesda take you to court to find out? ...


3

Your kid is not in trouble; he's a minor. You're in trouble. A criminal case for the charges a prosecutor would bring, i.e. destruction of property (the data) or for a relevant cyber or computer crime (malware, etc.), and/or a civil case for damages due to the destruction of the data would both hinge on one point: the concept of intent. See intent - Wex ...


3

australia There is no limitation on the number of names you can have so long as it is at least 1. You cannot have a prohibited name (NSW Births Deaths and Marriages Registration Act 1995, other states are similar): "prohibited name" means a name that-- (a) is obscene or offensive, or (b) could not practicably be established by repute or usage-- (...


3

The specific case depends on whether the foreign brand has protected their name in your country (you have very little chance), or whether the foreign brand is already well-known in your country (you might be up for a major fight and lose). There is the possibility that the foreign brand might grow and wants to expand into your country, in which case you ...


2

Titles like these have no legal meaning whatsoever - they are only a way of passing on respect to people by knowing their formal title and using it in the future. I am not aware of any government organization that includes your title as part of your legal name. Having worked in a government organization myself, no verification goes into checking these ...


2

Correction of named inventors is covered under 35 U.S.C. § 256. If all the parties agree that you should be named, the inventorship could possibly be corrected by a petition (and a fee, most likely) submitted to the USPTO. Otherwise, you may be able to retain a lawyer and sue to have your name added. However, that route would likely end up being rather ...


2

Pokemon names are trademarks by Nintendo. Trademarks prevent other people from using names/logos etc. so that consumers dont mistake someone else for the logo owner. However, the exclusivity that a trademark gives the trademark owner is limited to the industry that the trademark is registered to. So you cant make a game called "The Pikachu Game", because ...


2

Unsurprisingly, it depends on the country, the title and the form, amongst other things. A similar question focusing on a specific title got closed on Academia SE: Is the title Ph.D. or Dr. meaningless in the sense that anyone can use it? but might contain some interesting pointers. E.g.: The Regulated Professions Act restricts the use of title “doctor”, ...


2

If you are a citizen of Cyprus, you fill out the name change affidavit on a form available form your District Administrative Office before a notary, submit it with 80 Euros, and hope that the Registrar at the District Administrative Office approves your application. Your affidavit will state, among other things, your proposed name, which must be acceptable ...


2

If after marriage, I take both my and my spouses last names, would I need to update documents such as my passport and driver's license? Yes. I have done this (my premarital name was Willeke and my wife's was Oh) and you do need to update your documents if you do.


2

Names in and of themselves cannot be trademarked in the United States (or copyrighted or any other form of IP protection) and as such, one may use a pen name that belongs to a celebrity, provided that they aren't trying to protray themselves as a celebrity. It's entirely possible for a work of fiction to be written by "Jay Wood" the author and stares a ...


2

Typically the Government doesn't hire outside expert witnesses for their purposes unless the specialty is atypically nuanced. As a prosecution expert witnesses are part of the jurisidiction's crime lab and they specifically handled the evidence in question. The generic term will depend based on the jurisdictions of the handling, but are usually ...


1

The relevant statutes are designated in the Wikipedia article on the topic, and unfortunately I couldn't find any in translation. There are a couple of possible scenarios that might play out differently, and I suggest some plausible ways that the Hungarian law might address the issue, just from the general context of how naming laws often work in places ...


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