Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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Your court will surely lack jurisdiction against an unidentified scammer in a foreign country hiding behind a sequence of VPNs. Unless by some wild application of both skill and coincidience, you identify the scammer in a nation from which you have a chance of filing litigation. Yes, you would have a case that the requirement to keep a web browser page ...


0

Unauthorised access to your account, which granted access to personal data, would have constituted a data breach under GDPR. The obligations incumbent upon the controller (Company A) may include informing their supervisory authority and/or the data subject (you) once they became aware of the breach. When you reported it, and they received that report, the ...


14

This may be a good faith and fair dealing violation which would give the victim a civil cause of action to recover at least his original investment.


21

Accused of what? Clearly stating under which conditions you (the accuser) would earn money by doing nothing more than staying online for 7 days? You agreed to these conditions, but did not fulfill them, so the scammer (the accused) was the one that earned money for doing nothing. The scammer had the same motive as you had, earning money for doing ...


1

Could this US victim accuse this UK scammer? Yes Since uk and us has different legislations, how should the victim accuse the scammer? Report the scam to the relevant US authority (which is, I think, the FBI) They investigate and pass the information to the relevant UK authority (the Metropolitan Police, I think) They jointly investigate and if/when ...


1

does the platform actually has the right to indefinitely hold the monies No. But they do not claim to have such a right though: the ordinary meaning of "suspend" is not "indefinitely hold". A reasonable person would expect the suspension to be temporary — pending any investigation / police inquiry as to whether the funds were actually fraudulent. Such an ...


1

Given that this transaction will not be otherwise found fraudulent/reversed, does the platform actually has the right to indefinitely hold the monies they have no ownership over? Indefinitely: yes; forever: no. Once the fraud investigation is completed the money would be released (if clean) or sent to the true owner (if fraudulent). If the contract is ...


1

You got scammed. An H1B visa is what a company applies for so they can hire a non-citizen to legally work in the US. Any requirement by you to pay for one is a clear scam especially since it doesn't sound like you were applying to work for this "company". And as a Green Card holder, you are eligible to work in the US and don't need a H1B visa in the first ...


2

Under the Electronic Fund Transfer Act you must report the fraud right away: if you act within 2 days your liability is limited to $50. Since you acted very quickly, that's the most you can lose. It could be zero under the terms of your bank agreement. This section states the specifics of your liability.


0

What you can do about it is determined by your contract with the credit union and card usage agreement; read that and talk to the credit union's fraud person. You may be responsible for the charges, maybe not. You will be able to file a complaint and go through that process, and it may or may not help to be reimbursed for the fraud. And look at local and ...


-1

If you get insurance money to fix your car and have another wreck, you can use the money for the second wreck if there is enough to cover it. However, any insurance company I have used just pays the mechanic unless that is not possible, so you may not ever receive the money personally.


2

Can intentionally providing climate change disinformation known to the provider to be false be construed as fraud? No. That is insufficient for a finding of fraud. One of the prima facie elements of fraud is that the consumer of provider's information incur losses (aka consequent damage) as a result of that misrepresentation. See Elcon Const. v. Eastern ...


-2

It's not fraud because you aren't defrauding anyone out of anything. If you lie to someone about a topic, it's up to them to do the research and find the truth or what their opinion is. If you lie about a person or organization you may be sued for libel if you don't retract it. http://www.dmlp.org/legal-guide/retraction-law-california


1

Did i get scammed? Maybe but its not entirely clear that you are the victim of fraud. For fraud to occur, the perpetrator must have intended to deprive you of your money at the time they asked for it and we have no evidence of such an intent. Legally, it appears that you have an agreement (possibly a contract) that you would lend the person $200 (if you ...


-1

Yes you did get scammed and yes call the police. Don't tell him you are calling the police though.


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