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5

In all such offers that I have seen, there is an agreement explicitly saying that if the service is not cancelled by the end date of the trial, a recurring charge for the price of the service will be made, and the customer authorizes this. If there was such an agreement, the charges would be authorized, not fraudulent. The question does not say what ...


4

Assuming the USA, since that's where they appear to be located. Spreading misinformation is not illegal- it is protected by the first amendment. There are exceptions but I can't see how any would apply here. You haven't mentioned any that you think apply. If some of the videos on the site guaranteed results or made medical claims, maybe that could be ...


2

Always? No. Sometimes? Yes. australia Corporations Law The Corporations Act 2001 (Cth) imposes duties on officers and employees. Officer includes, as well as directors and secretaries, some other people who manage the corporation or its property (such as the CEO). Employees includes the CEO but not non-executive directors. ss180-183 impose duties of care and ...


3

No. There is no such thing as vicarious criminal liability. Anyone convicted of a crime needs to be personally involved and have knowledge of the relevant facts for co-conspirator or solicitation liability. There isn't really a single law that says it. It is rooted in the overall structure of the criminal codes at the state and the federal level, and in the ...


0

In the case of fraud, as in the case of most kinds of legal terminology. There isn't one definition. Different definitions apply in different contexts. Common Law Fraud Common law fraudulent misrepresentation in a lawsuit by the person harmed against the fraudster for money damages requires a knowingly false statement of a presently existing material fact ...


-1

While I agree with bdb484's answer as to the common law definition, I would argue that this is actually an answer that requires a specific jurisdiction to answer accurately, as many jurisdictions supersede the common law definition with their own. For example, in California (and civil court): California Civil Code, Section 3294(c3): “Fraud” means an ...


1

At common law, fraud is generally understood to have the following elements: a representation or, where there is a duty to disclose, concealment of a fact, which is material to the transaction at hand, made falsely, with knowledge of its falsity, or with such utter disregard and recklessness as to whether it is true or false that knowledge may be inferred, ...


1

maryland Different jurisdictions define "fraud" and various crimes differently. I am therefore concentrating on the laws of the state of Maryland, in the US, which I believe is reasonably typical of US laws on such topics. Criminal Fraud Title 8 of the Maryland Criminal Code (FRAUD AND RELATED CRIMES) prohibits a number of acts which it defines as ...


1

Let's say Elon Musk knew from reserve estimates, as well as basic physical reality, there wasn't enough lithium for his plans to work. This eventually resulted in battery shortages and collapsed the company. Is Elon Musk at fault for misleading investors into a business he knew was physically impossible to work? So you need a specific claim. You are right ...


2

The relevant questions would be whether the statement was material; what did he know about the truth of the statement; did he intend that the person would act in a particular way based on the statement; did the person know that the statement was false, did they rightfully rely on the statement being true, and were they harmed by that statement. Without that (...


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